Teaching

Guest lecture at ZYU in Shaoxing

2-KMVBS: Concepts and Research Methods in Security Studies

This course is an introduction to doing research in Political Science in general, and Security Studies in particular. The course is required for graduate students in Security Studies. Unregistered students, both graduate and undergraduate, from other programs at the Faculty of Political Science and International Relations at UMB are also welcome. 

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • critically evaluate and assess methodological choices in the field of Political Science, in particular with regard to the identification of research assumptions, evaluation of the power of arguments, implementation of research methods and resulting validity;
  • formulate their own research questions and then propose a suitable research design for their inquiry;
  • appropriately organize their own research projects in Security Studies;
  • conduct basic data gathering and data analysis.

A lighter workload version of this course is offered as 2-MTS for students in the VNDREAM joint MA degree programme.

2-MEDE: Media and Disinformation

2-MTB: Modern Technology and Security

This course examines some of the key concepts and security concerns in the domain of digital technology and society. The course is optional for graduate students in Security Studies, Political Science and International Relations. Unregistered undergraduate students at the Faculty of Political Science and International Relations at UMB are also welcome. 

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

(i) theoretical and methodological approaches to technology in political science; (ii) technological security challenges; (iii) key literature on technology, security and global politics in the social sciences.

  • demonstrate intellectual and transferable skills:

(i) critically address a wide range of concepts and ideas relevant to technology and security; (ii) exercise informed and independent critical judgment; (iii) formulate their own scientific arguments; (iv) communicate effectively and professionally in the context of technology and security issues.